Repeated Measure

 

Julie Andrews and Yodelling do not feature in my list of favourite things, but I seem to be drawing one up somewhat vaguely.

I suspect I am beginning to wonder how my horrifying and disordered dyslexic mind arrives at a solid empirical form through abstraction.

A messy and murky processes. I may be doing something else entirely, its not a certain science . But at the end it throws up something clear that I can work on more, accept or reject and let it become something else.

Clear Colourless Sound

I liked this reflection as I could still detect the outline of the female passenger on the bus, in somewhat altered form.

After taking the picture Red Eye on White , she now seems to be holding the outline of the container of  the candle I shot on the table in that shot.

Playing with random patterns and a growing familiarity with repetition in the shape and form things take, leads to the desire to give life to them.

Words and a past take hold.

One of my favourite images is from an old late 17 th century  flap book anatomy (like a modern children’s pop up book, where flaps reveal what’s under the surface) The Four Seasons.

Its a series of depictions of a male and female in each of the four seasons. images are fused with inscriptions and symbols from, medicine, astrology, alchemy, geography and philosophy.

Still not decipherable to modern eyes, but they were mass produced prints and hint at the entangled and complex range of subjects a late 17th century viewer would be familiar with.

The final image Winter, depicts the male and female subjects by a grave. Both are holding medical urine flasks, with the contents spilling on the ground.

Its a depiction of the vital fluids (the four humours) or the creative juices flowing.

Telling the story and imposing the image of Winter from the four seasons on my own, the shape in the eye at the top transform’s into a phoenix (it appears in the top centre of in the four seasons depiction of winter).  To my mind a vaguely Egyptian looking one in my image, the late 17th century artist went for a more goose like shape. I suspect he may have been using a much discussed late 17th century form, the barnacle goose and giving the myth a familiar and contemporary shape.

 

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