End

Poem I have looked at works on a simple mechanisim I think.

An empty space is drawn. A situation is furnished which allows the audiance to fill it with agency.

The nearst thing we get to a reveal of the identity of the speaker is at the end.

If this is destined for me, let it be grain and milk that I see.

If it is not destined for me, let it be wolves stags and wandering on the mountian and young warriors that I see.

Frame here is of a young landless male contemplating a settled existance on the farm or the unsettled life of a warrior on the hill.

It tells us nothing about the actual identity of the speaker but it gives an emotional frame of refrence that could be reached for by everyone who hears it at it has a reelationship with themselves.

This form of downward social movement is the central fault line in early medevial cultures of this type. Constant generational fragmentation of land as it is subdiveded among familes.

Church has managed this instability as property ownership is in the hands of an eternal supernatural landlord but within secular society, this downward movement effects both aristocracy and the abilty to keep large scale lordships in place down to the lowest rank of freeman one step away from debt slavery, who needs at least one cow and a small area of land to mark status.

The space the poem opens up is one of self refelection. It achieves this by attempting to ensure that the audience ends with the abilty to relate and empathise with the subject.

The who, what, where of the poem no longer matter as it’s emotional register can now be found and held anywhere in the space between a fire and a wall.

The emotional fabric here is created not in the voice of the speaker but in the mind of the listener.

The being created here can only exist if the speaker gives nothing away. Within itself the poem is being nothing.

Life and emotion here are drawn from elsewhere.

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2 thoughts on “End

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