violence (n.) violation (assault on honour)

For nobody dares to undertake responsibility for them, for their crime, on account of their audacity in committing crime. For the man who has committed the injury is bound to watch over them that they do not evil to any one, to wit satirizing, killing stock and summoning demons (respectively).

violence (n.)

late 13c., “physical force used to inflict injury or damage,” from Anglo-French and Old French violence (13c.), from Latin violentia “vehemence, impetuosity,” from violentus “vehement, forcible,” probably related to violare (see violation). Weakened sense of “improper treatment” is attested from 1590s.

violation (n.)
 
c. 1400, from Old French violacion and directly from Latin violationem (nominative violatio) “an injury, irreverence, profanation,” from past participle stem of violare “to treat with violence, outrage, dishonor,” perhaps an irregular derivative of vis “strength, force, power, energy,” from PIE root *weie- “to go after, pursue with vigor or desire” (see gain (v.)).
Reference
violence/ violation, O.E.D

on account of their audacity (as things appear to the others)

I would drink a drink in spite of my kinsfolk; not of the red wine of Spain but the blood of you’re body to me, a better drink

nobody dares to undertake responsibility for them, for their crime

His sons, his brothers, and his relatives by marriage, the members of his kindred and his soldiers were united.”

Hittite proclamation of King Telepinus.

dyad

Sayings of the Just (The Names of the Persons in the ensuing NARRATIVE mentioned, with others.) Besides, many more, who each night heard the noise

 

For nobody dares to undertake responsibility for them, for their crime, on account of their audacity in committing crime. For the man who has committed the injury is bound to watch over them that they do not evil to any one, to wit satirizing, killing stock and summoning demons (respectively).

Reference

Bretha Crolige (the law of bloodlying) 7th cen.

Confael

Conrechta

Be foimrimme

 

Preface (Night of the Living Read)

And now as to the Penman of this Narrative, know, that he was a Divine and at the time of those things acted, which are here related, the Minister and School-master of Woodstock, a person learned and discreet, not by∣assed with factious humors, his name Widows, who each day put in writing what he heard from their mouthes (and such things as they told to have befallen them the night before) therein keeping to their own words; And never thinking that what he had writ, should happen to be made publick (1), gave it no better dress to set it forth. And because to do it now, shall not be construed to change the story, The reader hath it here accordingly exposed.

Reference

Thomas Widows, The just devil of Woodstock. Or, A true narrative of the several apparitions, the frights, and punishments, inflicted………

Note

(1) It is a diary, which was exactly kept by the Author for his own satisfaction, intending not to print it. But after his death the copy coming into the hands of another Person, ’twas printed in Dec. 1660

A. Wood, Athenæ Oxonienses. Vol. 2.

no birds do sing

ἔντερον

inter- 

 

word-forming element used freely in English, “between, among, during,” from Latin inter (prep., adv.) “among, between, betwixt, in the midst of” (also used extensively as a prefix), from PIE *enter “between, among” (source also of Sanskrit antar, Old Persian antar “among, between,” Greek entera (plural) “intestines,” Old Irish eter, Old Welsh ithr “among, between,” Gothic undar, Old English under “under”), a comparative of root *en “in.”

interest (v.)

“cause to be interested, engage the attention of,” c. 1600, earlier interesse (1560s), from the noun (see interest (n.)). Perhaps also from or influenced by interess’d, past participle of interesse.

interest (n.)

mid-15c., “legal claim or right; a concern; a benefit, advantage, a being concerned or affected (advantageously),” from Old French interest “damage, loss, harm” (Modern French intérêt), from noun use of Latin interest “it is of importance, it makes a difference,” third person singular present of interresse “to concern, make a difference, be of importance,” literally “to be between,” from inter “between” (see inter-) + esse “to be” (from PIE root *es- “to be”). The sense development to “profit, advantage” in French and English is not entirely clear.

The earlier Middle English word was interesse (late 14c.), from Anglo-French interesse “what one has a legal concern in,” from Medieval Latin interesse “compensation for loss,” noun use of Latin interresse (compare German Interesse, from the same Medieval Latin source).

Financial sense of “money paid for the use of money lent” (1520s) earlier was distinguished from usury (illegal under Church law) by being in reference to “compensation due from a defaulting debtor.” Sense of “personal or selfish consideration” is from 1620s. Meaning “business in which several people are interested” is from 1670s. Meaning “curiosity, feeling that something concerns one, appreciative or sympathetic regard” is first attested 1771. Interest group is attested from 1907; interest rate by 1868.

Reference

interest, O.E.D

lost in performance

 

No- birds do sing (I Heard You Call My Name)

Screenshot 2022-01-26 at 03-05-25 Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus a collection of Old-Irish glosses, Scholia prose and verse Sto[...]

anonymous (adj.)

c. 1600, “without a name;” 1670s, “published under no name, of unknown authorship,” from Late Latin anonymus, from Greek anonymos “without a name,” from an- “without” (see an- (1)) + onyma, Æolic dialectal form of onoma “name” (from PIE root *no-men- “name”).

Reference

anonymous, O.E.D

The Swallow flieth swift, but where she lighteth, there is no remembrance of her being

Desire (Crime and Punishment)

Cut and Paste the process of arrest

nobody dares to undertake responsibility for them, for their crime

on account of their audacity in committing crime

For the man……….. is bound to watch over them

(so) that they do not evil to any one, to wit satirizing, killing stock and summoning demons (respectively)

 

Don’t Call Me Scarface

This is the reason: it is justified vengeance that she wreaks, and that does not destroy her honour price.

honour bound/ of the fall