The Hounds of Fionn

Tuiren then walked from the house with the messenger, but when they had gone a short distance Uct Dealv drew a hazel rod from beneath her cloak and struck it on the queen’s shoulder, and on the instant Tuiren’s figure trembled and quivered, and it began to whirl inwards and downwards, and she changed into the appearance of a hound………

………… Uct Dealv went then to the house of Fergus Fionnliath, and she broke the enchantment that was on the hound, so that Tuiren’s own shape came back to her; but in the matter of two small whelps, to which the hound had given birth, the enchantment could not be broken, so they had to remain as they were. These two whelps were Bran and Sceo’lan. They were sent to Fionn, and he loved them for ever after, for they were loyal and affectionate, as only dogs can be, and they were as intelligent as human beings. Besides that, they were Fionn’s own cousins.

Reference

J. Stephens, Irish Fairy Tales

by which it is nourished, augmented, and begets another like unto itsel

•♥*

?

Expulsion

?Retention        =(o•o)=    Concoction?

Attraction

?

 

 

·o)= •♥*?

I want to place =(oo)=

in the middle and say ‘I rest in the heat’ ( I have no idea why).

I was also wondering what would happen if I magically transformed a barnacle goose into a dog.

I can do that as its a medieval animal.

Is it outwardly a dog but inwardly a fish?

A fish in wolfs clothing?

i.e. it transforms into a bird yet it retains the classification of being a fish.

From birth.

Or can I say from its expulsion?

Concoction: what happens at this stage?

I suppose I want to know the processes that produces a wart, a planet and a barnacle goose.

What makes the difference (sometimes things look much the same)?

Grab what I can on the hoof from the 17th century and play around with it.

I notice with the etymological history three dates seem to repeat, 12th, 14th and 16th century.

12th, 14th, 16th, 17th century.

What belongs where? How does it alter?

 

Of the Soul and her Faculties

Vegetal Soul.] Vegetal, the first of the three distinct faculties, is defined to be “a substantial act of an organical body, by which it is nourished, augmented, and begets another like unto itself” In which definition, three several operations are specified –altrix, auctrix, procreatrix; the first is nutrition, whose object is nourishment, meat, drink, and the like; his organ the liver in sensible creatures; in plants, the root or sap. His office is to turn the nutriment into the substance of the body nourished, which he performs by natural heat. This nutritive operation hath four other subordinate functions or powers belonging to it — attraction, retention, digestion, expulsion.

Attraction.] Attraction is a ministering faculty, which, as a loadstone doth iron, draws meat into the stomach, or as a lamp doth oil; and this attractive power is very necessary in plants, which suck up moisture by the root, as another mouth, into the sap, as a like stomach.

Retention.] Retention keeps it, being attracted into the stomach, until such time it be concocted; for if it should pass away straight, the body could not be nourished.

Digestion.] Digestion is performed by natural heat; for as the flame of a torch consumes oil, wax, tallow, so doth it alter and digest the nutritive matter. Indigestion is opposite unto it, for want of natural heat, Of this digestion there be three differences — maturation, elixation, assation.

Maturation.] Maturation is especially observed in the fruits of trees; which are then said to be ripe, when the seeds are fit to be sown again. Crudity is opposed to it, which gluttons, epicures, and idle persons are most subject unto, that use no exercise to stir natural heat, or else choke it, as too much wood puts out a fire.

Elixation.] Elixation is the seething of meat in the stomach, by the said natural heat, as meat is boiled in a pot; to which corruption or putrefaction is opposite.

Assation.] Assation is a concoction, of the inward moisture by heat; his opposite is a semiustulation.

Order of Concoction four-fold.] Besides these three several operations of digestion, there is a four-fold order of concoction:– mastication, or chewing in the mouth; chilification of this so chewed meat in the stomach; the third is in the liver, to turn this chylus into blood, called sanguification; the last is assimulation, which is in every part.

Expulsion.] Expulsion is a power of nutrition, by which it expels all superfluous excrements, and reliques of meat and drink, by the guts, bladder, pores; as by purging, vomiting, spitting, sweating, urine, hairs, nails, &c.

Augmentation.] As this nutritive faculty serves to nourish the body, so doth the augmenting faculty (the second operation or power of the vegetal faculty) to the increasing of it in quantity, according to all dimensions, long, broad, thick, and to make it grow till it come to his due proportion and perfect shape; which hath his period of augmentation, as of consumption; and that most certain, as the poet observes:–

“Stat sua cuique dies, breve et irreparabile tempus
Omnibus est vitæ”–

“A term of life is set to every man,
Which is but short, and pass it no one can.”

Generation.] The last of these vegetal faculties is generation, which begets another by means of seed, like unto itself to the perpetual preservation of the species. To this faculty they ascribe three subordinate operations:– the first to turn nourishment into seed, &c.

Reference

R. Burton, Anatomy of Melancholia

Note

Seems to be in the right ball park.

drawing together

Expulsion

Retention                    Concoction 

Attraction

Attraction, Retention, Concoction, and Expulsion

Medical, looks like something learned by rote.

c. 1400, attraccioun, originally medical, “action or property of drawing (diseased matter) to the surface,” from Old French atraccion (13c.) and directly from Latin attractionem (nominative attractio) “a drawing together,” noun of action from past-participle stem of attrahere “to draw, pull” (see attract).

Extended by c. 1600 to magnetic forces; figurative sense “quality in a person which draws interest or imagination” is from c. 1600. Meaning “a thing which draws a crowd, interesting or amusing exhibition” is from 1829, a sense that developed in English and soon transferred to the French equivalent of the word.

 

late 14c., from Latin retentionem (nominative retentio) “a retaining, a holding back,” noun of action from past participle stem of retinere (see retain). Originally medical; mental sense is from late 15c.

 

1530s, “digestion” (a sense now obsolete), from Latin concoctionem (nominative concoctio) “digestion,” noun of action from past participle stem of concoquere “to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well,” from assimilated form of com “together” (see con-) + coquere “to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest,” from PIE root *pekw- “to cook, ripen.”

Meaning “that which is concocted” is by 1850, figurative; meaning “a devising, a planning, act of preparing and combining the materials of anything” is from 1823.

 

c. 1400, expulsioun, in medicine, “act of expelling matter from the body,” from Old French expulsion or directly from Latin expulsionem (nominative expulsio), noun of action from past-participle stem of expellere “drive out” (see expel). From late 15c. as “forcible ejection, compulsory dismissal, banishment” as from a school or club.

 

 

 

•♥*

c. 1400, attraccioun, originally medical, “action or property of drawing (diseased matter) to the surface,” from Old French atraccion (13c.) and directly from Latin attractionem (nominative attractio) “a drawing together,” noun of action from past-participle stem of attrahere “to draw, pull” (see attract).

Extended by c. 1600 to magnetic forces; figurative sense “quality in a person which draws interest or imagination” is from c. 1600. Meaning “a thing which draws a crowd, interesting or amusing exhibition” is from 1829, a sense that developed in English and soon transferred to the French equivalent of the word.

Reference

O.E.D, Attraction •

• O * (Artificial Fireworks)

 

•= wens

o= orange

*= star jelly

• O * (Warts and All)

wens = star jelly (both are excremental substances). Robert Boyle (his mouth seeming to curve in an ironic smile) notes that his friend a doctor used star jelly to treat wens.

Like for like= sympathy.

Star jelly crumbles to dust, metaphorical it becomes associated with artificial beauty, the fleeting nature of life, folly and vanity. 

a deep-seated feeling of aversion= antipathy.

Acquired by Imitation

*

↑↓

*

Up/ Down/ Rate of Decay

*= Man/ Orangutan

Movement in two directions.

Time

It rises and falls.

*(more or less)

Variety.

Subject to modification = culture*(more or less)

The Exacting Nature of An Orange (A discourse of artificial beauty in point of conscience)

 

No idea what I am doing, still looking at shit and taste.

Messy.

(

 

o                                       *

 

Dunghill to diamond.

Got some sense of movement.

Taste gives me no real sense of movement or space and a degree of error, that would become more apparent over time.

I noticed I imagined Robert Hooke’s words before I read them a moment ago.

Anyway

↑↓

Up/ down/ decay

↓Orangutan

*

↑Man

Artificial beauty/ Adulterating arts. Time, its effect on body, soul and the imagination.

A late 17th century history of mind as if in miniature.